Here’s what’s on the menu at UK restaurant that named itself Pike & Pine

The Seattle Times this week reported on the city’s ongoing restaurant boom — 2,696 tallied earlier this year, up 25% from a decade ago. Many of those opened on Capitol Hill — CHS has counted somewhere around 172 new Hill openings since 2012. And many of those Hill openings came in the Pike/Pine neighborhood as the area’s auto row bones were put to new, high-ceilinged, wood-beamed uses.

It may not be entirely surprising, then, to learn that the neighborhood has inspired a culinary venture and lent its name to the undertaking. In Brighton, UK, a restaurant calling itself Pike & Pine opened earlier this year. Continue reading

From creator of Roq La Rue, Creatura House comes home to E Pike

Back from trips abroad and creating a nonprofit, Kirsten Anderson is again starting up an art gallery, but this time it’s intertwined with retail and, in a twist for the traveler, home.

Anderson founded art gallery Roq La Rue in 1998 and ran the space until it shuttered last year. It had a successful run, eventually, profits began to fall and Anderson felt burnt out on the arts scene.

“I thought this was a good time to step out and explore other things I want to do,” she said. Anderson spent her time exploring other countries as she raised money for her nonprofit. “I really missed having a space here in Seattle, being a part of the community. I had really gotten into home decor, and pulled in fine arts.”

Creatura House will be a home decor shop mingled with select art. The products will not be mass produced. To reside at 705 E Pike next to Babeland and Honeyhole, the shop opens December 8th with artist Peter Ferguson’s series of new paintings for his exhibition “I’ll Line My Nest With Your Bones.”

Skate style shop Alive and Well will be making way for the new venture.

The arts business, for a while, wasn’t something Anderson thought she’d get back into.

“Artwork has changed so much and mid level galleries have been blown out,” she said. Anderson fiddles with one of the many rings on her tattooed fingers. They’re delicate tattoos, like dots and arrows. Larger tattoos decorated her arms and her earrings sparkled green and maroon beneath her black hair. Her subdued and darker style matched that of her artistic interests.

“I’m really into anything that’s dark and beautiful, not necessarily macabre, but I appreciate dark things as well,” Anderson said. “I’m completely driven by aesthetics, my whole life. I have made a living selling beautiful things to people. I like to make environments that are beautiful for people.”

She said she likes to straddle the line between absolutely beautiful and somewhat grotesque. Anderson pictures Creatura House warm, beautiful, and with a decayed opulence. Continue reading

King County to ‘reorg’ a public health approach to juvenile justice

King County Executive Dow Constantine signed an order Thursday directing the health department to make a plan and timeline for juvenile justice reform. Seattle Police Department Chief Kathleen O’Toole supports the order.

“I wholeheartedly support this bold step to transform the way our community handles juvenile offenders,” O’Toole said in a statement. “Credible research suggests that we can reduce crime by bringing a rehabilitative, public health approach to juvenile justice. In addition to the change that’s being announced today, I also believe we must continue to expand programs that support all of Seattle’s young people early in life, investments that are essential to preventing youth from becoming offenders in the first place.” Continue reading

Moving past Paseo, Bok a Bok landing next to Neumos with Korean-style deep fried chicken

Neumos has a rocking new partner to provide chow in its adjacent restaurant space and to provide spicy accompaniment to the cold brew and cocktails it serves at its sibling bar The Runaway and inside the live music venue itself.

White Center born Bok a Bok Chicken will bring its Korean-style deep fried drumsticks and more to the small space on 10th sandwiched between the club and The Runaway bar.

“I’m amped to be opening Bok a Bok on Capitol Hill,” chef-owner Brian O’Connor says in the announcement of the new project. “We’ve spent a great deal of time honing our fried chicken skills down south and are looking forward to our new neighbors trying it out.”

Bok a Bok’s recipe will bring new flavors to Capitol Hill’s nosh scene:

Bok A Bok’s menu centers around Korean-style fried chicken, with a crispier take on the traditional batter sealing in the juicy, natural flavors from fresh, sustainably-raised chickens. Inspired by O’Connor’s travels throughout Asia, his unique spin on fried chicken sets the restaurant apart from others in the Pacific Northwest. Guests can pair fried chicken breast; drumsticks, thighs and wings with a selection of house made dipping sauces ranging from sweet to spicy. The menu also features rice bowls, fried chicken sandwiches, and comfort-inspired sides including kimchi, ginger coleslaw, mac n’ cheese and house-made biscuits.

The project replaces the much-hyped but apparently underwhelming arrival of the Paseo chain on Capitol Hill. Ryan Santwire purchased the rights to the Paseo name and its original Fremont location before expanding with Paseo Capitol Hill. The 10th and Pike Paseo debuted in February earlier this year in the space left empty when Pike Street Fish Fry closed in late 2015. Despite the hype, the restaurant lasted about nine months and quietly closed recently. We have a message out to Santwire to learn more about the closure and will update if we hear back. UPDATE: Paseo is searching for a new Hill home, Santwire tells CHS. “We are moving, as we need more room and want/need to do alcohol in our space,” he writes. The goal is to find a place that can accommodate a full Paseo Cantina with room to also fill the needs of the company’s catering business.

Bok a Bok is set to open December 1st.

Bok a Bok will be located at 925 E Pike with an entrance on 10th Ave. You can learn more at facebook.com/bokabokfriedchicken.

 

Central District artist’s sculpture will be part of 23rd/Union redevelopment

James Washington, Jr. (Image courtesy James & Janie Washington Foundation)

A work by an important Central District African American artist will be restored in the midst of coming redevelopment set to reshape the corner of 23rd and Union.

The James and Janie Washington Foundation, a museum and art gallery to commemorate and preserve the work of James Washington Jr, announced the planned restoration of the “Fountain of Triumph” sculpture that has called the MidTown shopping center home since the 1990s.

The sculpture will temporarily move from MidTown to the foundation’s property on 26th Avenue and Denny so the Pratt Fine Arts center can restore it. When the sculpture returns to its original location, it will be part of a major new mixed-use development that will partner a for-profit developer with affordable housing and community nonprofits including Africatown.

James Washington Jr., an African American writer and artist, created “The Fountain of Triumph” in the late 1990s. He passed away in 2000 at 90 years old. Meant to be a community meeting place and focal point for unity in an ever-changing neighborhood, the sculpture will stay true to Washington Jr.’s original intent as it gets restored and placed in Africatown.

“We’re so pleased that LUP is helping to restore and return this meaningful sculpture to its original location,” said Washington Foundation board president Reverend LaVerne Hall in the announcement of the project. “We’re thrilled it will be returning it to its former glory.” Continue reading

E Olive Way the next land of Capitol Hill pot opportunity as three shops line up for two spots

(Image: nduffy45 via Instagram)

Three different businesses want to open a pot shop on E Olive Way between Melrose and Denny. City rules would permit two locations to open, but the third could be left out.

Northwest Cannabis applied for a shop in a building next to The Crescent on October 20th. That entity is backed by marijuana advocate John Davis, and somehow involves Ian Eisenberg, owner of Uncle Ike’s.

The Reef filed its application November 9th, and wants to open a shop in the Amante Pizza building.

Finally, The Bakeree filed an application November 14th, looking to open in the building the houses John John’s Game Room, though not necessarily in the John John’s space.

In another wrinkle, all three buildings changed hands in recent months. The Reef’s proposed home sold for $1.4 million in June. In September, Eisenberg paid more than $2 million for the former law offices next to the Crescent. The biggest deal of them all also went down in September. Real estate investment firm Teutsch Partners snapped up the building home to John John’s, Pie Bar, and the Speckled and Drake bar for a whopping $4.3 million. Continue reading

Two big items on Sound Transit’s agenda for lots of affordable housing on Broadway, First Hill — UPDATE

UPDATE 3:35 PM: The Sound Transit board approved both motions Thursday afternoon paving the way for a “no cost” transfer of two First Hill properties to nonprofit developers Bellwether Housing and Plymouth Housing and, in the second vote, putting in place a memorandum of understanding between the transit agency, Seattle Central, and Capitol Hill Housing for a swap of Capitol Hill properties. Details on the plans are below.

In public comments, Bellwether’s CEO Susan Boyd called the joint proposal with Plymouth “a bold plan” that will create much needed affordable housing on First Hill.

Board member and Seattle City Council member Rob Johnson called the First Hill proposal “very consistent with what the community asked for” and said the neighborhood’s “YIMBY” spirit was reflected in the plan.

King County Executive Dow Constantine said affordable housing is now central to Sound Transit’s mission as it also works to provide transit to the region’s growing population. Pierce County Executive Bruce Dammeier, meanwhile, voted against the motion saying he was troubled by the “no cost” aspect of the plan as a “dangerous precedent.”

Additionally, the board also approved a motion on a plan for “Central Transit-Oriented Development” near the Roosevelt light rail station that will involve Bellwether and Mercy Housing Northwest.

Original report: Sound Transit’s board is scheduled to make two key decisions on property it owns across First Hill and Capitol Hill that will potentially open the way for big deals around affordable housing and and expanded Seattle Central.

The Sound Transit Board will vote Thursday whether to move forward with two land deals.

One motion paves the way negotiate with Plymouth Housing and Bellwether Housing in a purchase of Sound Transit land at 1014 Boylston Ave and 1400 Madison meant for high-rise affordable housing, up to 160 feet.

“We thought in viewing their proposal that their numbers were reasonable,” said Sarah Lovell from Sound Transit. “It is an expensive project. It’s expensive to build a high-rise. But stacking two housing project increases their ability to get subsidies. They’re trying to be really efficient with their design.” Continue reading

Capitol Hill Pets | Jeremy and Doctor on Broadway

Jeremy, a huge Dr. Who (David Tennant version) fan, was hanging out near Seattle Central with his pup Doctor when we stopped by to say hello. “He loves to run, play, and get into mischief. We are *his* companions. People think he’s a miniature Rottweiler, but you can’t do that,” Jeremy tells us. Doctor is a four-year-old Carlin Pinscher, which is a mix between a pug and a mini-Pinscher. “Our previous dog was a German Rottweiler, and after he passed away we had to downsize for the city,” Jeremy said. “The German Rott was a lot nicer, Doctor’s nice too, but he’s a little putz sometimes.” Continue reading

A new item for your Capitol Hill first aid kit — overdose antidote

As Seattle officials spar over how to pay for safe consumption sites and where to put them, you might consider a new tool to add to your Capitol Hill safety and first aid kit. In late October, drugstore chain Walgreens announced it would begin stocking naloxone in its stores across the country. CHS bought a kit to find out what’s inside — and, hopefully, be ready to help.

Sold under the Narcan brand, the nasal spray “antidote” can reverse the effects of opioid including heroin and prescription painkillers. For $82, the kit we purchased comes with a syringe and an attachment for the nasal spray. Each kit is good for two applications. You’ll find directions inside and online training videos like this one, below, from Kelley-Ross Pharmacies, which also stocks the kits. Meanwhile, free kits are available via King County Health and organizations like The People’s Harm Reduction Alliance.

Nasal naloxone kits are now standard issue for Seattle bike cops after a pilot program proved their efficacy.

Officials continue to work toward opening safe consumption sites in King County and Seattle. Opioid and heroin abuse, meanwhile, remains a massive public safety issue for the city.

How Seattle ‘shared parking’ proposal could help renters — even if you don’t drive

Rendering of the future parking garage entrance to 11th Ave’s under-construction Kelly Springfield building

With a push from Capitol Hill and the neighborhood’s seemingly insatiable appetite for parking, Seattle is moving forward with a plan that could create pools of shared parking in buildings across the city, reducing the need for developers to create large parking structures, and allowing more buildings to offer parking on the open market.

“If a building has unused parking stalls, we shouldn’t block them from renting those spaces out to someone who needs a place to keep their vehicle,” Mayor Tim Burgess said in the announcement of the legislation his office has sent to the City Council for consideration. “I hear complaints about the on-street parking crunch in our densest neighborhoods, and I’ve experienced it myself. It’s the reason I’m advancing this comprehensive package of parking options, ranging from making car share parking more available to changing parking requirements for income-restricted housing.”

Here are the details of the new proposal: Continue reading